The story so far:

In the beginning the Universe was created.
This has made a lot of people very angry and has been widely regarded as a bad move.
It is known that there are an infinite number of worlds, simply because there is an infinite amount of space for them to be in. However, not every one of them is inhabited. Therefore, there must be a finite number of inhabited worlds. Any finite number divided by infinity is as near to nothing as makes no odds, so the average population of all the planets in the Universe can be said to be zero. From this it follows that the population of the whole Universe is also zero, and that any people you may meet from time to time are merely the products of a deranged imagination.
 
  1. Notes: 738 / 8 hours ago  from ilovecharts
  2. Notes: 5 / 8 hours ago 
    UK to allow driverless cars on public roads in January

The UK government has announced that driverless cars will be allowed on public roads from January next year.
It also invited cities to compete to host one of three trials of the tech, which would start at the same time.
In addition, ministers ordered a review of the UK’s road regulations to provide appropriate guidelines.

The UK is finally joining in with the push for self driving cars and they plan to change the rules of the road in order to do this. 
Self driving cars pose a lot of difficult questions that relate to the AI and autonomy. For instance, if a self driving car is involved in a collision, who is at fault? The software engineers, or the hardware engineers? Or the company that produced the car?
By completing an overhaul of outdated rules this problem with hopefully be eliminated before difficulties arise. Hopefully this also sets precedence for other law overhauls with rapidly advancing technology, especially the internet.

    UK to allow driverless cars on public roads in January

    The UK government has announced that driverless cars will be allowed on public roads from January next year.

    It also invited cities to compete to host one of three trials of the tech, which would start at the same time.

    In addition, ministers ordered a review of the UK’s road regulations to provide appropriate guidelines.

    The UK is finally joining in with the push for self driving cars and they plan to change the rules of the road in order to do this. 

    Self driving cars pose a lot of difficult questions that relate to the AI and autonomy. For instance, if a self driving car is involved in a collision, who is at fault? The software engineers, or the hardware engineers? Or the company that produced the car?

    By completing an overhaul of outdated rules this problem with hopefully be eliminated before difficulties arise. Hopefully this also sets precedence for other law overhauls with rapidly advancing technology, especially the internet.

     

  3. Notes: 2545 / 1 day ago  from jtotheizzoe (originally from afro-dominicano)

    NPR Science: Sorry, Lucy: The Myth Of The Misused Brain Is 100 Percent False

    ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:
    If you went to the movie theater this weekend, you might've caught the latest Scarlett Johansson action movie called "Lucy." It's about a woman who develops superpowers by harnessing the full potential of her brain.
    (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LUCY")
    SCARLETT JOHANSSON: I'm able to do things I've never done before. I feel everything and I can control the elements around me.
    UNIDENTIFIED MAN: That's amazing.
    WESTERVELT: You've probably heard this idea before. Most people only use 10% of their brains. The other 90% of the basically dormant. Well, in the movie "Lucy," Morgan Freeman gives us this what-if scenario?
    (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "LUCY")
    MORGAN FREEMAN: What if there was a way of accessing 100% of our brain? What might we be capable of?
    DAVID EAGLEMAN: We would be capable of exactly what we're doing now, which is to say, we do use a hundred percent of our brain.
    WESTERVELT: That is David Eagleman.
    EAGLEMAN: I'm a neuroscientist at Baylor College of Medicine.
    WESTERVELT: And he says, basically, all of us are like Lucy. We use all of our brains, all of time.
    EAGLEMAN: Even when you're just sitting around doing nothing your brain is screaming with activity all the time, around the clock; even when you're asleep it's screaming with activity.
    WESTERVELT: In other words, this is a total myth. Very wrong, but still very popular. Take this clip from an Ellen DeGeneres stand-up special.
    (SOUNDBITE OF STAND-UP SPECIAL)
    ELLEN DEGENERES: It's true, they say we use ten percent of our brain. Ten percent of our brain. And I think, imagine what we could accomplish if we used the other 60 percent? Do you know what I'm saying?
    AUDIENCE: (LAUGHTER).
    (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "TOMMY BOY")
    DAVID SPADE: Let's say the average person uses ten percent of their brain.
    WESTERVELT: It's even in the movie "Tommy Boy."
    (SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "TOMMY BOY")
    SPADE: How much do you use? One and a half percent. The rest is clogged with malted hops and bong residue.
    WESTERVELT: Ariana Anderson is a researcher at UCLA. She looks at brain scans all day long. And she says, if someone were actually using just ten percent of their brain capacity...
    ARIANA ANDERSON: Well, they would probably be declared brain-dead.
    WESTERVELT: Sorry, "Tommy Boy." No one knows exactly where this myth came from but it's been around since at least the early 1900's. So why is this wrong idea still so popular?
    ANDERSON: Probably gives us some sort of hope that if we are doing things we shouldn't do, such as watching too much TV, alcohol abuse, well, it might be damaging our brain but it's probably damaging the 90 percent that we don't use. And that's not true. Whenever you're doing something that damages your brain, it's damaging something that's being used, and it's going to leave some sort of deficit behind.
    EAGLEMAN: For a long time I've wondered, why is this such a sticky myth?
    WESTERVELT: Again, David Eagleman.
    EAGLEMAN: And I think it's because it gives us a sense that there's something there to be unlocked, that we could be so much better than we could. And really, this has the same appeal as any fairytale or superhero story. I mean, it's the neural equivalent to Peter Parker becoming Spiderman.
    WESTERVELT: In other words, it's an idea that belongs in Hollywood.
  4. Notes: 65904 / 1 day ago  from soupsan (originally from dezeen)
    guyrim:

dezeen:

The “first man-made biological leaf” could enable humans to colonise space»

if you aren’t hyped about synthetic life and colonizing space then get out of my face

This is pretty cool stuff, but if it consumes water then that could be a problem for space travel as water is also rather important for human life.

    guyrim:

    dezeen:

    The “first man-made biological leaf” could enable humans to colonise space»

    if you aren’t hyped about synthetic life and colonizing space then get out of my face

    This is pretty cool stuff, but if it consumes water then that could be a problem for space travel as water is also rather important for human life.

     

  5. Notes: 40 / 2 days ago  from shitphysicspeoplesay
    "A nuclear reactor is just a fancy kettle."
    - Nuclear Physics Lecturer (via shitphysicspeoplesay)
  6. Notes: 1018 / 2 days ago  from zhegames
    zhegames:

Under The Influence
Over the course of several months and $300+ dollars, I made a T-Shirt that plays a fully functional game of pong.  Here’s a video of the thing in action. I didn’t make this for the art assignment per-say, but it applies so I’m sharing.
The very obvious inspiration comes from my love of old video games. For the hardware restrictions they had at the time they could do some amazing things. I did the same thing here. I ran the game off of an Arduino pro mega, which runs at 16MHz, which is less than a tenth of the power than in your smart phone. With that I have to work inside of a 14x15 pixel grid. It may not be easy to make art in that space, even though I could probably recreate a Rothko, but it’s fun to think of clever ways to overcome the challenges I face by restricting myself. It was a bit of a challenge to get “pong play” to appear legibly at the beginning of the game without having each letter bleed into the next, but when I got everything to work it felt simply amazing.
I got a lot of my inspiration to build this from Limor Fried, as well as the company Sparkfun. Certain electrical projects have a style to them, not just externally but internally as well. It wasn’t until now when I realized jsut how much of my style I had gotten from them and incorporated into my design. A big part of Adafruit (the company founded by Limor Fried) is wearable tech. I not only got some of the components and libraries from them, but seeing them create motivated me to do the same.
Speaking of mimicking the style of others, I documented the process so you can see what it was like building this. On top of that, I put the code up on GitHub for others. I know you guys aren’t programmers and couldn’t comment on my code (double meaning for people who can program, *wink* *wink*) but there really is an art to programming. A programmer can brute force his or her way through a problem or cleverly tip toe around it. They can name their variables whatever they want without changing the function of the code, and certain styles will become evident. Many put no nonsense descriptions in their Debug Log but many others will leave little jokes to tell them if something isn’t working correctly or short encouragements to tell them if it is. Not to mention some of the hilarity that can ensue between “/*” and “*/” or after “//” due to boredom. In the code I provide I even give one little reference to Star Wars.
While most of the time programming is given a happy personality or just left to be neutral there is no rule saying it has to be that way. It can occasionally take on a deeper or darker meaning, but really, as in most things, it’s up to the artist.

    zhegames:

    Under The Influence

    Over the course of several months and $300+ dollars, I made a T-Shirt that plays a fully functional game of pong.  Here’s a video of the thing in action. I didn’t make this for the art assignment per-say, but it applies so I’m sharing.

    The very obvious inspiration comes from my love of old video games. For the hardware restrictions they had at the time they could do some amazing things. I did the same thing here. I ran the game off of an Arduino pro mega, which runs at 16MHz, which is less than a tenth of the power than in your smart phone. With that I have to work inside of a 14x15 pixel grid. It may not be easy to make art in that space, even though I could probably recreate a Rothko, but it’s fun to think of clever ways to overcome the challenges I face by restricting myself. It was a bit of a challenge to get “pong play” to appear legibly at the beginning of the game without having each letter bleed into the next, but when I got everything to work it felt simply amazing.

    I got a lot of my inspiration to build this from Limor Fried, as well as the company Sparkfun. Certain electrical projects have a style to them, not just externally but internally as well. It wasn’t until now when I realized jsut how much of my style I had gotten from them and incorporated into my design. A big part of Adafruit (the company founded by Limor Fried) is wearable tech. I not only got some of the components and libraries from them, but seeing them create motivated me to do the same.

    Speaking of mimicking the style of others, I documented the process so you can see what it was like building this. On top of that, I put the code up on GitHub for others. I know you guys aren’t programmers and couldn’t comment on my code (double meaning for people who can program, *wink* *wink*) but there really is an art to programming. A programmer can brute force his or her way through a problem or cleverly tip toe around it. They can name their variables whatever they want without changing the function of the code, and certain styles will become evident. Many put no nonsense descriptions in their Debug Log but many others will leave little jokes to tell them if something isn’t working correctly or short encouragements to tell them if it is. Not to mention some of the hilarity that can ensue between “/*” and “*/” or after “//” due to boredom. In the code I provide I even give one little reference to Star Wars.

    While most of the time programming is given a happy personality or just left to be neutral there is no rule saying it has to be that way. It can occasionally take on a deeper or darker meaning, but really, as in most things, it’s up to the artist.

     

  7. Notes: 3 / 2 days ago 
    Insane Amounts of Rain in South East England

Lightning strikes, hail, torrential rain and flash flooding have caused major travel problems across east and south-east England.
There have been problems on the roads in Sussex, Essex and London.
London Fire Brigade said it was helping people trapped in their cars across parts of the capital.

I was awoken about dawn this morning by rain that sounded like a continuous roll of thunder. I went back to sleep thinking it was just British summer being British and all that.
I wake up this morning, and the photo above is the main road less than two miles from my house. Fire brigade has been rescuing people from cars trapped in flash floods nearby, and the drainage systems of some people in the area have been flooded.

    Insane Amounts of Rain in South East England

    Lightning strikes, hail, torrential rain and flash flooding have caused major travel problems across east and south-east England.

    There have been problems on the roads in Sussex, Essex and London.

    London Fire Brigade said it was helping people trapped in their cars across parts of the capital.

    I was awoken about dawn this morning by rain that sounded like a continuous roll of thunder. I went back to sleep thinking it was just British summer being British and all that.

    I wake up this morning, and the photo above is the main road less than two miles from my house. Fire brigade has been rescuing people from cars trapped in flash floods nearby, and the drainage systems of some people in the area have been flooded.

     

  8. Notes: 9338 / 3 days ago  from parastatic (originally from malcolm-f-tucker)
     

  9. Notes: 736 / 3 days ago  from freshphotons (originally from schornacklab)
    schornacklab:

Not Pacman - a bursting spore of the arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus Rhizophagus irregularis - releasing oil droplets. Picture: Ruth Le Fevre

    schornacklab:

    Not Pacman - a bursting spore of the arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus Rhizophagus irregularis - releasing oil droplets. Picture: Ruth Le Fevre

     

  10. Notes: 231 / 3 days ago  from scienceisbeauty

    scienceisbeauty:

    Chicken, eggs, tomatoes and pinapple, I never would have thought that this blog would feature rotten food. But even there you can find (some) beauty (especially because the Internet does not transmit the smell).

    Over a period of nine months, fine art photographer Klaus Pichler turned the bathroom of his studio apartment into a curated collection of plastic containers, each containing food items available to the average citizen of industrialized Europe.

    Full history at National Geographic: Visualizing Waste: Klaus Pichler’s Gorgeous, Rotting Food.

  11. Notes: 1971 / 3 days ago  from likeafieldmouse (originally from blue-voids)
    blue-voids:

Valeska Soares - Duet, 2008 - Hand-carved marble

    blue-voids:

    Valeska Soares - Duet, 2008 - Hand-carved marble

     

  12. Notes: 17078 / 6 days ago  from physicistsneedlovetoo (originally from nubbsgalore)

    nubbsgalore:

    circumhorizontal arcs photographed by (click pic) david england, andy cripe, del zane, todd sackmann and brandon rios. this atmospheric phenomenon, otherwise known as a fire rainbow, is created when light from a sun that is at least 58 degrees above the horizon passes through the hexagonal ice crystals that form cirrus clouds which, because of quick cloud formation, have become horizontally aligned. (see also: previous cloud posts)

  13. Notes: 24980 / 1 week ago  from afro-dominicano (originally from socialismartnature)
    badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:


socialismartnature:

Breaking via ABC News: UN Human Rights Council votes to open inquiry into alleged war crimes in Gaza; U.S. is the ONLY “no” vote.
That’s because the U.S. is a direct accomplice to every war crime that Israel commits.

USA, the world’s #1 killing machine.

    badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

    socialismartnature:

    Breaking via ABC News: UN Human Rights Council votes to open inquiry into alleged war crimes in Gaza; U.S. is the ONLY “no” vote.

    That’s because the U.S. is a direct accomplice to every war crime that Israel commits.

    USA, the world’s #1 killing machine.

    (Source: twitter.com)

     

  14. Notes: 4 / 1 week ago  from hoarephotography
    hoarephotography:

Two Sides of the Same Coin

    hoarephotography:

    Two Sides of the Same Coin

     

  15. Notes: 422 / 1 week ago  from counterfeit-toast (originally from trigonometry-is-my-bitch)
    counterfeit-toast:

lakidaa:

transhumanisticpanspermia:

mj-the-scientist:

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

at around 13.2 degrees Celsius, β-form white tin transforms to α-form grey tin due to tin pests (or tin disease). The transformation process requires high activation energy but very low temperatures and the presence of Germanium can aid in initiation. 

Do you ever see something that just makes you physically uncomfortable?

oh my god this is really cool, i just looked into it
the beta form is metallic, and the alpha form is an octahedral covalent network (the same as diamond, in case you were wondering)
it’s a self-catalyzed direct transformation from a metallic to crystal substance!
also, since this reaction only takes place and low temperatures, and based on the fact that it’s forming a crystal, it likely has a negative change in entropy. (i couldn’t find an actual delta-s value, but there’s not much else it could be but negative.)
a self-catalyzed reaction which reduces entropy. neato.
edit: found it! ΔH°=-2.03 kJ/mol and ΔS°=-7.1 J/mol°K. yep, negative entropy and exothermic.

Tin Pest is also very historically important. Turns out sending your soldiers into Russia with tin buttons is a terrible idea.
gj napoleon

The Napoleon thing is unlikely at best. (scroll down)

    counterfeit-toast:

    lakidaa:

    transhumanisticpanspermia:

    mj-the-scientist:

    trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

    at around 13.2 degrees Celsius, β-form white tin transforms to α-form grey tin due to tin pests (or tin disease). The transformation process requires high activation energy but very low temperatures and the presence of Germanium can aid in initiation. 

    Do you ever see something that just makes you physically uncomfortable?

    oh my god this is really cool, i just looked into it

    the beta form is metallic, and the alpha form is an octahedral covalent network (the same as diamond, in case you were wondering)

    it’s a self-catalyzed direct transformation from a metallic to crystal substance!

    also, since this reaction only takes place and low temperatures, and based on the fact that it’s forming a crystal, it likely has a negative change in entropy. (i couldn’t find an actual delta-s value, but there’s not much else it could be but negative.)

    a self-catalyzed reaction which reduces entropy. neato.

    edit: found itΔH°=-2.03 kJ/mol and ΔS°=-7.1 J/mol°K. yep, negative entropy and exothermic.

    Tin Pest is also very historically important. Turns out sending your soldiers into Russia with tin buttons is a terrible idea.

    gj napoleon

    The Napoleon thing is unlikely at best. (scroll down)

     

avatar_128
 
 
I'm Daniel Hoare, but more often than not I'm just referred to as 'Hoare'. Beginning the second stage of my life by studying physics at the University of Bath

And I know you're jealous of my name.


An exploration of science, art and the beauty of the universe with a drop of humour.

Youtube
- Stuff thats mine
- The Day-to-day achievements of my life
-But... Why?
- My DeviantArt
- My Art
- My photography
 
 

Tumblr